6 January, 2020

Your Parents Should Have End-Of-Life Care Plans

2020-05-22T19:29:52-07:00January 6th, 2020|Categories: End-Of-Life Care Planning|

As your parents age, some conversations that need to happen can prove to be rather difficult. It is understandable that you would want to skip over these but doing so can be disastrous down the road. Instead of putting this off, take the time to discuss these matters now so that you know the plans when the time comes. One important thing to talk about is what sort of end-of-life care your parents want. There are two important documents that can ensure that your parent's wishes will be followed. One is an Advance Directive to Physicians, sometimes called a living ...

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13 September, 2016

6 Questions You Need To Ask Your Parents

2020-05-22T19:39:19-07:00September 13th, 2016|Categories: End-Of-Life Care Planning, Estate Planning, Long Term Care, Planning For Your Loved Ones, Probate, Scams|

For many people, imagining a time when their parents are the ones who need to be taken care of is challenging. For so much of your life, they are the ones who took care of you. While it may be difficult to envision, the truth is that it’s likely going to be a reality. Whether they need full-time care or they just need some guidance in making sure that their affairs are in order, your parents will likely need some extra support. Having some conversations sooner, rather than later, can ensure that everything is decided upon long before there needs ...

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7 January, 2012

What Are The Essential Documents That I Need To Have In Place In Case I Become Incapacitated?

2020-05-22T19:55:41-07:00January 7th, 2012|Categories: End-Of-Life Care Planning, Estate Planning, Planning For Yourself|

All adults should have a Durable General Power of Attorney (sometimes called a Durable Power of Attorney for Finances), a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions, (sometimes called a Health Care Proxy) and an Advance Directive to Physicians (or Living Will). Some people should also have a POLST - Physician's Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment. Durable General Power Of Attorney This document, sometimes called a Durable Power of Attorney for Finances, names a person to handle your financial affairs if you are incapacitated. You are the "principal" and the person you name is the "attorney-in-fact" or "agent." In ...

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24 January, 2011

Making End of Life Decisions a Little Easier

2020-05-22T19:57:09-07:00January 24th, 2011|Categories: End-Of-Life Care Planning|

As a 21-year-old acting as attorney-in-fact for my 76-year-old grandmother, I faced one of the hardest decisions I would ever have to make. My grandmother had a severe stroke and, without significant medical intervention, she would not survive more than a few hours. As emergency room doctor explained all of the possible interventions to my sister and me, I felt at once pained and grateful. I felt grateful for the fact that my grandmother had on numerous occasions expressed her end-of-life wishes to me and had put those wishes in writing. I felt pained knowing that I was about to ...

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27 November, 2010

Give Your Loved Ones the Information They Need

2020-05-22T19:57:24-07:00November 27th, 2010|Categories: End-Of-Life Care Planning, Estate Planning|

It seems that we get letters and solicitations everyday encouraging us to go "paperless." These letters are often from banks, credit card companies, and housing lenders. In the past, when a person passed away their loved ones would simply check their mail to find out what financial investments were out there or what bills were owed. As more of us choose to receive our monthly statements via email, it becomes that much more imperative to include a letter of instruction with your estate planning documents. A letter of instruction gives your loved ones the necessary information needed to handle your ...

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